Commit 1532a244 authored by Pavel Machek's avatar Pavel Machek

mj's fixes to rip documentation.

parent a7c9f7c0
......@@ -978,76 +978,76 @@ protocol pipe { # The Pipe
}
</code>
<sect>Rip
<sect>RIP
<sect1>Introduction
<p>Rip protocol (sometimes called Rest In Pieces) is a simple protocol, where each router broadcasts
distances to all networks it can reach. When router hears distance to other network, it increments
<p>The RIP protocol (also sometimes called Rest In Pieces) is a simple protocol, where each router broadcasts (to all its neighbors)
distances to all networks it can reach. When a router hears distance to another network, it increments
it and broadcasts it back. Broadcasts are done in regular intervals. Therefore, if some network goes
unreachable, routers keep telling each other that distance is old distance plus 1 (actually, plus
interface metric, which is usually one). After some time, distance reaches infinity (that's 15 in
rip) and all routers know that network is unreachable. Rip tries to minimize situations where
unreachable, routers keep telling each other that its distance is the original distance plus 1 (actually, plus
interface metric, which is usually one). After some time, the distance reaches infinity (that's 15 in
RIP) and all routers know that network is unreachable. RIP tries to minimize situations where
counting to infinity is necessary, because it is slow. Due to infinity being 16, you can't use
rip on networks where maximal distance is bigger than 15 hosts. You can read more about rip at <HTMLURL
URL="http://www.ietf.org/html.charters/rip-charter.html">. Both IPv4
and IPv6 versions of rip are supported by BIRD, historical RIPv1 is
RIP on networks where maximal distance is higher than 15 hosts. You can read more about rip at <HTMLURL
URL="http://www.ietf.org/html.charters/rip-charter.html" TEXT="http://www.ietf.org/html.charters/rip-charter.html">. Both IPv4
and IPv6 versions of RIP are supported by BIRD, historical RIPv1 is
currently not fully supported.
<p>Rip is very simple protocol, and it is not too good. Slow
convergence, big network load and inability to handle bigger networks
<p>RIP is a very simple protocol, and it has a lot of shortcomings. Slow
convergence, big network load and inability to handle larger networks
makes it pretty much obsolete in IPv4 world. (It is still usable on
very small networks, through.) It is widely used in IPv6 world,
because they are no good implementations of OSPFv3.
very small networks.) It is widely used in IPv6 networks,
because there are no good implementations of OSPFv3.
<sect1>Configuration
<p>In addition to options generic to other protocols, rip supports following options:
<p>In addition to options common for all to other protocols, RIP supports the following ones:
<descrip>
<tag/authentication none|password|md5/ selects authentication method to use. None means that
packets are not authenticated at all, password means that plaintext password is embedded
into each packet, and md5 means that packets are authenticated using md5 cryptographic
hash. If you set authentication to non-none, it is good idea to add <cf>passwords { }</cf>
<tag/authentication none|password|md5/ selects authentication method to be used. <cf/none/ means that
packets are not authenticated at all, <cf/password/ means that a plaintext password is embedded
into each packet, and <cf/md5/ means that packets are authenticated using a md5 cryptographic
hash. If you set authentication to not-none, it is a good idea to add <cf>passwords { }</cf>
section.
<tag>honor always|neighbor|never </tag>specifies, when should be requests for dumping routing table
honored. (Always, when sent from host on directly connected
network, or never.) Routing table updates are honored only from
<tag>honor always|neighbor|never </tag>specifies when should requests for dumping routing table
be honored. (Always, when sent from a host on a directly connected
network or never.) Routing table updates are honored only from
neighbors, that is not configurable.
</descrip>
<p>There are two options that can be specified per-interface. First is <cf>metric</cf>, with
default one. Second is <cf>mode multicast|broadcast|quiet|nolisten|version1</cf>, it selects mode for
rip to work in. If nothing is specified, rip runs in multicast mode. <cf>version1</cf> is
currently equivalent to <cf>broadcast</cf>, and it makes rip talk at broadcast address even
through multicast mode is possible. <cf>quiet</cf> option means that rip will not transmit
periodic messages onto this interface and <cf>nolisten</cf> means that rip will talk to this
interface but not listen on it.
currently equivalent to <cf>broadcast</cf>, and it makes RIP talk to a broadcast address even
through multicast mode is possible. <cf>quiet</cf> option means that RIP will not transmit
any periodic messages to this interface and <cf>nolisten</cf> means that RIP will send to this
interface but not listen to it.
<p>Following options generally override specified behavior from RFC. If you use any of these
options, BIRD will no longer be RFC-compatible, which means it will not be able to talk to anything
other than equally misconfigured BIRD. I warned you.
<p>The following options generally override behavior specified in RFC. If you use any of these
options, BIRD will no longer be RFC-compliant, which means it will not be able to talk to anything
other than equally configured BIRD. I have warned you.
<descrip>
<tag>port <M>number</M></tag>
selects IP port to operate on, default 520. (This is useful when testing BIRD, if you
set this to address &gt;1024, you will not need to run bird with UID==0).
set this to an address &gt;1024, you will not need to run bird with UID==0).
<tag>infinity <M>number</M></tag>
select value of infinity, default 16. Bigger values will make protocol convergence
selects the value of infinity, default is 16. Bigger values will make protocol convergence
even slower.
<tag>period <M>number</M>
</tag>specifies number of seconds between periodic updates. Default is 30 seconds. Lower
</tag>specifies the number of seconds between periodic updates. Default is 30 seconds. A lower
number will mean faster convergence but bigger network
load. Do not use values lower than 10.
<tag>timeout time <M>number</M>
</tag>specifies how old route has to be to be considered unreachable. Default is 4*period.
</tag>specifies how old route has to be to be considered unreachable. Default is 4*<cf/period/.
<tag>garbage time <M>number</M>
</tag>specifies how old route has to be to be discarded. Default is 10*period.
</tag>specifies how old route has to be to be discarded. Default is 10*<cf/period/.
</descrip>
<sect1>Attributes
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